Andrew Abraham

andy-0101 My name in Andrew Abraham. I have been investing in commodities and managed futures since 1994. I adhere to the philosophy of trend following. Trend following stresses a disciplined approach to commodity/ futures trading. Successful trend following and commodity futures investing requires patience, discipline and actively managing the risk. What sets me apart from other traders is that I am not only concerned about the return on investment but how much risk I will have to tolerate to achieve my goals.

Contact Details

If you are interested in contacting for speaking engagements. Please email me at Andrabr9@gmail.com or call 954 903 0638.

Books Worth Reading

Sponsored Listings

Risk Warning

Futures and commodity trading involve substantial risk. The evaluations of futures and commodities may fluctuate and as a result, clients may lose more than their original investment. In no event should the content of this website be construed as an express or an implied promise, guarantee or implication by, that you will profit, or that losses can or will be limited in any manner whatsoever. Past results are no indication of future performance. Information provided on this website is intended solely for informative purposes and is obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Information is in no way guaranteed. No guarantee of any kind is implied or possible, where projections of future conditions are attempted.

infolinks

Links

Trend Following CTA abraham investment management
Binary Options
Learn Forex Trading Online
Get a grip on forex trading with this free online course.
Tax Software

How Reliable Are The Banks True “Profits”?

question-mark

I am far from being negative. However,I find it questionable to believe all the statements coming out of the FED that the bail out has worked and we will avoid an economic depression. Hopefully we will only encounter an economic recession. An economic recession is healthy and wrings out the excesses of the economy.

The FEDs have stated that all of the 14 largest banks have earned a ג€œpassingג€ grade in their just-completed ג€œstress tests.ג€ But just six months ago, the same swore ( scared us) that, without a massive injection of taxpayer funds, those same banks would suffer a fatal meltdown. That was why they instituted a bail out. Maybe I am being too picky but Ben Bernanke stated the debt crisis would not exceed $100 billion. Also the International Monetary Fund (IMF) estimated the losses would be $1 trillion, with only a small percentage written off. Well the truth is both have vastly underestimated the carnage and their bail out has not really worked. The IMFג€™s latest estimate: $4 trillion in losses, with only 1/3 of those written off so far. This does not even start with the issue of derivatives. How did the bail out help these toxic assets?

Looking a little more carefully,JPMorgan Chase one of the largest US banks has 1.7 trillion in assets in its main banking unit. The issue is that it is horribly exposed to defaults by its trading partners in derivatives ( remember counter party risks) ג€” It is stated that it is almost four time its risk-based capital.

Next on the list is Citibank, the nationג€™s third largest, with assets of $1.2 trillion in its main banking unit. Its total credit exposure to derivatives is a about three times. To make both issues even more obvious…what about surging default rates in credit cards, consumer loans, CDOs and CLOs. Next Goldman Sachs, which reported for the first time as a commercial bank in the 4th quarter, took the biggest risks of all in derivatives. Its total credit exposure is 1,056 percent of capital.
Wells Fargo and Wachovia jointly comprise the US fourth largest bank with combined assets of $1.17 trillion. They have their fare share of MAJOR Problems. Even TheStreet.com Ratings has downgraded Wells Fargo to a D+ and Wachovia got a D. So whose ratings do you believe the FED with their Stress Tests… or an unbiased TheStreet.com?

I can keep on going on and on with the large US banks… but isn’t it clear? Maybe yesterday was just a harbinger of what we will seeing? Will the dominoes start falling again?
What do you think?

www.myinvestorsplace.com

Free Video
Is the S&P running out of gas?


Be Sociable, Share!
Add This! Blinkbits Blinklist Blogmarks BlogMemes BlueDot BlogLines co.mments Connotea del.icio.us de.lirio.us Digg Diigo DZone Facebook FeedMeLinks Folkd.com Fleck Furl Google Google Reader icio.de IndianPad Leonaut LinkaGoGo Linkarena Linkter Magnolia Mister Wong MyShare Ask.com MyStuff Ask.com Yahoo! MyWeb Netscape Netvouz Newsgator Newsvine Oneview.de RawSugar reddit Rojo Segnalo Shadows Simpy SlashDot Smarking Sphere Spurl Startaid StumbleUpon TailRank Technorati ThisNext yigg.de Webnews.de ReadMe.ru Dobavi.com Dao.bg Lubimi.com Ping.bg Pipe.bg Svejo.net Web-bg.com Plugin by Dichev.com

Leave a Reply

 

 

 

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>